#0151 Campo de Cahuenga

Title

#0151 Campo de Cahuenga

Site information:

3919 Lankershim Blvd, North Hollywood

34.139763,-118.36227

Plaque information:

Multiple private plaques

Plaque text:

Campo de Cahuenga

On the site of this building was signed the peace treaty agreement between Mexico and the United States by Gen. Andres Pico and Lt. Col. John Fremont January 13, 1847. This building erected 1950 by the Department of Recreation and Parks, City of Los Angeles.

Plaque placed by San Fernando Valley Historical Society.

Plaque text:

Campo de Cahuenga

Site where Andres Pico, representing the California forces, capitulated to John C. Fremont, representing the American ground forces, in the treaty of Cahuenga Pass, January 13, 1847.

Los Angeles Parlor No. 45, N.S.G.W. Dedicated by the Native Sons of the Golden West, James M. Smith, Grand President January 11, 1981.

Plaque text:

Campo de Cahuenga
Original Adobe

The markings on the sidewalk indicate the actual location of the historic adobe foundation and floor tiles buried beneath the street, sidewalk, and landscaped areas.  The articles of capitulation of teh Treaty of Cahuenga between the United States and Mexico were signed here in 1847, ending the hostilities in California between the two countries.

Plaque text:

Campo de Cahuenga
Original Adobe

Beneath this park rest the stone foundations and floor tiles of the historic adobe where Mexican General Andres Pico and U.S. Lieutenant Colonel John C. Fremont signed the Treaty of Cahuenga on January 13, 1847. Signing the Treaty ended the hostilities in California between the United States and Mexico, and led to the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, which ceded California to the U.S. and formally ended the Mexican-American War. The adobe, then owned by a Spaniard, Eulogio de Celis, may have been built as early as 1795 when this land on El Camino Real was occupied by a veteran Mexican soldier, Mariano de la Luz Verdugo. Between 1810 and 1834, the San Fernando Mission owned the land.

The adobe also served as a stop on the Butterfield Stage from 1858 to 1861. Butterfield carried passengers, mail, and cargo throughout the western United States from Tipton, MO to San Francisco, CA.

During construction of the Metro Rail station, the MTA team uncovered, researched, evaluated, and cataloged these foundations. In 1997, the archaeological remains of the adobe were determined eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.  The remnants have been protected in place for future generations to discover, observe and interpret.
Registered 1/11/1935

Collection

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